New action plan to prevent child wasting in 15 countries in the next two years

Rome – Enhancing nutrition in emergency agriculture responses and building resilience of the most vulnerable populations can break the vicious cycle of distress that underlies child wasting, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) said today as it launched its new child wasting prevention action plan.

With the plan, FAO intends to scale up and improve efforts to tackle child wasting by enhancing the/a nutrition component in the humanitarian response and development assistance targeting primarily households with at-risk children, pregnant and lactating women and girls.

To implement this, FAO requires $500 million for the period of 2023–2024 to assist one million households in the 15 most-affected countries. These countries hosting 27 million children in severe food insecurity and at high risk of becoming wasted are: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, the Niger, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, the Sudan and Yemen.

“We urgently need to complement lifesaving interventions with a prevention strategy that will keep those recovered children out of wasting and prevent future cases in communities and households most at risk,” said FAO Director-General QU Dongyu in the foreword to the action plan. “The time is urgent to enable communities themselves to bridge the divide between short-term humanitarian assistance, and the prevention-focused development activities. It is only by sustainably decreasing acute food insecurity that we can prevent the scourge of child wasting in the longer term.”

Child wasting is on the rise

Child wasting persists at alarming rates. In 2020, 47 million children were already wasted. The lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic shutdowns and now the food and fuel price crisis are exacerbating the situation, further deepening poverty and worsening food insecurity and malnutrition for millions of people.

New action plan

Child wasting is a major health problem with life-long consequences not just for well-being but also for human capital and economic development, prosperity and social equity. FAO’s commitment on child wasting is to ensure that children are breastfed then have access to an adequate and diverse diet in the first years of their lives by supporting agrifood systems that provide healthy and nutritious food to meet the needs of children and women.

FAO’s action plan will deliver three key outputs:

• Agrifood system interventions to prevent child wasting will be scaled up. FAO will focus on small-scale farming and home gardening, small animal husbandry, food and nutrition education (including support to breastfeeding and infant and young child feeding), food safety measures (including animal treatment, food handling, storage and minimal processing), and cash-based interventions such as cash+.

• Skills and knowledge on gender-sensitive and nutritious production will be enhanced. To maximize the nutritional impact, FAO’s response will promote production and consumption of nutrient rich crops and high nutritious livestock products (iron, vitamins A and C, zinc), which also provide energy and protein. Particular attention will be given to support a combination of productive and income-generating activities in order to diversify livelihoods and provide more regular sources of income to protect and develop productive assets in rural areas.

• Food security analysis, coordination and information management will be ensured. The constant monitoring of the food security situation and the integration of food and dietary data is key to understand the risk factors of child wasting and support the tailoring and evaluation of preventive strategies.

This strategic approach will be implemented in close collaboration and coordination with national governments and the United Nations agencies and partners.

The new plan of action will contribute to the Global Action Plan on Child Wasting, commissioned in 2019 by the Secretary-General of the United Nations António Guterres. The plan brought together five UN agencies: FAO, the Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The agencies are committed to coordinate and concentrate their actions to ensure that households with children in situations of vulnerability are enabled to access safe and nutritious food and the services (including addressing specific nutrition issues such as anaemia among women and girls) needed to prevent wasting and ensure that recovered children do not fall back into wasting.

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Violence Against Women: The European Union establishes an EU-wide helpline number and calls to end violence against women worldwide

Ahead of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November, the European Commission and High Representative/Vice President, Josep Borrell issued the following statement:

“Violence against women happens in every country. The facts are shocking – in the EU and across the world, one in three women have experienced physical or sexual violence. One in five girls today are victims of child sexual abuse. Online violence is on the rise, with one in two young women experiencing gender-based cyber violence.

The EU condemns all forms of violence against women and girls. It is unacceptable in the 21st century that women and girls continue to be abused, harassed, raped, mutilated or forced into marriage.

In March this year, the European Commission proposed new EU rules to combat violence against women, including online. Today, the Commission is also announcing the establishment of a common EU helpline number for victims of violence against women – 116 016.

This year, we pay particular attention to violence against women in conflict areas. In Ukraine, Russian armed forces are committing acts of sexual violence, and the millions of women and children fleeing the Russian aggression into the EU and neighbouring countries require proper support and protection.

In Iran, women are abused, exploited, oppressed, harassed, jailed, fined and flogged for demanding freedom and equality. In Afghanistan, the Taliban have dismantled all protection mechanisms established over the past 20 years to protect women and girls from abuse, violence and forced marriages. Women face violence also in humanitarian crises from Myanmar to northern Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

We remain steadfast in our ambition to end violence against women inside and outside the EU. The EU stands in solidarity with the women and girls, victims and survivors of violence. We will continue to support civil society, women’s rights organisations and human rights defenders demanding accountability.”

Background

Today, the European Commission is announcing the EU-wide harmonised number for helplines for victims of violence against women – 116 016. Women who are victims of violence will be able to call the same number across the EU to get advice and support. So far, 15 Member States have committed to connecting their existing helpline for victims of violence against women to this number. The deadline for Member States to reserve the common EU number to connect to national helplines is end of April 2023.

The European Commission is committed to preventing and combating gender-based violence, as stated in the EU Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025. The European Pillar of Social Rights Action Plan reaffirms the commitment to proposing new rules to put an end to gender-based violence against women, including work harassment on grounds of sex. The Commission provides funding for projects and organisations to tackle gender-based violence through the Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values Programme.

On 8 March 2022, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a directive to combat violence against women and domestic violence. The proposal aims to ensure that the most serious forms of violence against women are criminalised across the EU, such as rape, female genital mutilation and gender-based cyber violence, including cyber stalking and non-consensual sharing of intimate images.

On 11 May 2022, the Commission adopted a proposal for a Regulation on preventing and combating child sexual abuse. The new proposal will oblige providers to detect, report and remove child sexual abuse material on their services.

The Commission continues to work on the EU’s accession to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence – the Istanbul Convention.

In parallel, the Commission is working on the implementation of its first EU Strategy on victims’ rights (2020-2025) including a possible revision in 2023.

The majority of victims of trafficking registered in the EU are women and girls. The EU’s legal and policy framework is set out in the Anti-trafficking Directive. In April 2021, the Commission presented the presented the EU Strategy on combating trafficking in human beings (2021-2025), which emphasises the protection of victims at all stages, taking into account, in particular, women and child victims, and trafficking for sexual exploitation. The Commission will continue to strengthen measures to combat trafficking in human beings and plans to propose a revision of the Anti-Trafficking Directive in December 2022.

Internationally, the Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women Empowerment in External Relations 2020 – 2025 (GAP III) provides an ambitious external policy framework for achieving progress on gender equality and women’s empowerment. The EU will continue its efforts to curb sexual and gender-based violence throughout the world, including in conflict and emergencies. For example, the global Spotlight Initiative, with an initial EU investment of €500 million, aims to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls. The EU is furthermore an active member of the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies, a global cross-stakeholder initiative with more than 100 members that aims to drive change and foster accountability from the humanitarian system to address gender-based violence from the earliest phases of a crisis.

The European Commission is participating as every year in the UN Women’s Orange the World campaign. The photographs of the College members wearing orange scarfs will be available on EBS as of Friday 25 November.

Source: EU in Ethiopia

Violence Against Women: The European Union establishes an EU-wide helpline number and calls to end violence against women worldwide

Ahead of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November, the European Commission and High Representative/Vice President, Josep Borrell issued the following statement:

“Violence against women happens in every country. The facts are shocking – in the EU and across the world, one in three women have experienced physical or sexual violence. One in five girls today are victims of child sexual abuse. Online violence is on the rise, with one in two young women experiencing gender-based cyber violence.

The EU condemns all forms of violence against women and girls. It is unacceptable in the 21st century that women and girls continue to be abused, harassed, raped, mutilated or forced into marriage.

In March this year, the European Commission proposed new EU rules to combat violence against women, including online. Today, the Commission is also announcing the establishment of a common EU helpline number for victims of violence against women – 116 016.

This year, we pay particular attention to violence against women in conflict areas. In Ukraine, Russian armed forces are committing acts of sexual violence, and the millions of women and children fleeing the Russian aggression into the EU and neighbouring countries require proper support and protection.

In Iran, women are abused, exploited, oppressed, harassed, jailed, fined and flogged for demanding freedom and equality. In Afghanistan, the Taliban have dismantled all protection mechanisms established over the past 20 years to protect women and girls from abuse, violence and forced marriages. Women face violence also in humanitarian crises from Myanmar to northern Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

We remain steadfast in our ambition to end violence against women inside and outside the EU. The EU stands in solidarity with the women and girls, victims and survivors of violence. We will continue to support civil society, women’s rights organisations and human rights defenders demanding accountability.”

Background

Today, the European Commission is announcing the EU-wide harmonised number for helplines for victims of violence against women – 116 016. Women who are victims of violence will be able to call the same number across the EU to get advice and support. So far, 15 Member States have committed to connecting their existing helpline for victims of violence against women to this number. The deadline for Member States to reserve the common EU number to connect to national helplines is end of April 2023.

The European Commission is committed to preventing and combating gender-based violence, as stated in the EU Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025. The European Pillar of Social Rights Action Plan reaffirms the commitment to proposing new rules to put an end to gender-based violence against women, including work harassment on grounds of sex. The Commission provides funding for projects and organisations to tackle gender-based violence through the Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values Programme.

On 8 March 2022, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a directive to combat violence against women and domestic violence. The proposal aims to ensure that the most serious forms of violence against women are criminalised across the EU, such as rape, female genital mutilation and gender-based cyber violence, including cyber stalking and non-consensual sharing of intimate images.

On 11 May 2022, the Commission adopted a proposal for a Regulation on preventing and combating child sexual abuse. The new proposal will oblige providers to detect, report and remove child sexual abuse material on their services.

The Commission continues to work on the EU’s accession to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence – the Istanbul Convention.

In parallel, the Commission is working on the implementation of its first EU Strategy on victims’ rights (2020-2025) including a possible revision in 2023.

The majority of victims of trafficking registered in the EU are women and girls. The EU’s legal and policy framework is set out in the Anti-trafficking Directive. In April 2021, the Commission presented the presented the EU Strategy on combating trafficking in human beings (2021-2025), which emphasises the protection of victims at all stages, taking into account, in particular, women and child victims, and trafficking for sexual exploitation. The Commission will continue to strengthen measures to combat trafficking in human beings and plans to propose a revision of the Anti-Trafficking Directive in December 2022.

Internationally, the Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women Empowerment in External Relations 2020 – 2025 (GAP III) provides an ambitious external policy framework for achieving progress on gender equality and women’s empowerment. The EU will continue its efforts to curb sexual and gender-based violence throughout the world, including in conflict and emergencies. For example, the global Spotlight Initiative, with an initial EU investment of €500 million, aims to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls. The EU is furthermore an active member of the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-Based Violence in Emergencies, a global cross-stakeholder initiative with more than 100 members that aims to drive change and foster accountability from the humanitarian system to address gender-based violence from the earliest phases of a crisis.

The European Commission is participating as every year in the UN Women’s Orange the World campaign. The photographs of the College members wearing orange scarfs will be available on EBS as of Friday 25 November.

Source: EU in Ethiopia

Addis Ababa University Grants Academic Recognition

Addis Ababa University (AAU) recognized the merit of researchers, students and publishers who have registered impactful results in recent years in the University on November 21, 2022.

Professor Tassew Weldehanna, President of AAU, in his opening address said that in order to produce skilful students, teachers should act as role models and fulfil their responsibility of building the next generation properly.

According to Prof. Tassew, after conducting an in-depth study, the University has given recognition to students, researchers and publishers who have achieved better performances in its various colleges and institutions.

The professor stated that the recognition was given to scholars who have published research works in internationally recognized journals and who have completed their service period and contributed much in community services.

“University scholars and researchers should realize that the recognition given to them is an additional responsibility and should focus on providing problem-solving research works to the society,” Prof. Tassew urged.

Mitikie Molla (PhD), Addis Ababa University Vice President for Research and Technology Transfer, in her turn said that more than 700 researcher teachers and students who achieved better performance were selected for the recognition.

She said that out of these, academic researchers who have published their research works in well-known journals according to the criteria set by the University, have been selected and qualified for the award.

The accredited scholars, on their part, mentioned that their researches were the result of cooperation and qualified for recognition because they were able to work in a spirit of cooperation with their professional partners.

In addition to the researchers’ recognized in the program, Professor Tassew Woldehanna, the President, himself was also recognized for publishing 14 research articles in the field of economics within the last six months.

Source: Addis Ababa University